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Hannah Foskett

Space Jam 2 Officially Starring Lebron James

Space Jam 2 Is Officially Starring LeBron James

If you grew up in the 90s, you’d probably be lying if you said that the movie Space Jam wasn’t an iconic part of your childhood.

The 1996 cult classic starred NBA superstar, Michael Jordan, and the loveable cartoon cast of the Looney Tunes. Still the highest grossing basketball film ever released, Space Jam is coming back 20 years later—with a new face.

Following several years of rumors and speculations, LeBron James’ company, SpringHill Entertainment is believed to have signed a deal with Warner Bros on the project.

The film will be produced by Black Panther’s Ryan Coogler, and directed by Terence Nance.

“The Space Jam collaboration is so much more than just me and the Looney Tunes getting together and doing this movie.

“It’s so much bigger. I’d just love for kids to understand how empowered they can feel and how empowered they can be if they don’t just give up on their dreams. And I think Ryan did that for a lot of people.” James emphasized his appreciation for Coogler’s work.

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, James and his business manager, Maverick Carter, stressed that the new movie will not be a sequel to Space Jam. Instead, they called it a “reboot” and even spoke about the new movie generating its own sequels.

Like its predecessor, the new movie is expected to include several NBA players as cameos, and Carter even discussed the idea of Jordan appearing.

“Hopefully there will be a role for Michael if he wants it. But Michael Jordan is Michael [expletive] Jordan.

“LeBron and Michael are not sitting around talking about Space Jam,” he quipped.

SpringHill Entertainment also shared a picture on social media, revealing an image of a locker room. The image shows L. James, 23 as a “small forward” and B. Bunny (Bugs Bunny), 1 as a “point guard”—both are basketball positions.

Feeling excited? Sadly, the rumored release dater Space Jam 2 is 2021, but when the Laker’s season is over, expect to see James trying to fill Michael Jordan’s basketball sneakers (rather him than us).

For now, take comfort in the knowledge that Space Jam is back, and maybe use it as an excuse to revisit the old classic.

Further reading: Idris Elba Pegged as the Next James Bond

Emmys

“We Solved it!” Diversity at the Emmys

The Primetime Emmys televised jokes about diversity, but failed to select a diverse winning pool.

After president Donald Trump called last year’s Emmy ratings “the worst ever”, the 2018 Primetime Emmy Awards took things to a new level. A record-low audience of 10.2 million put the Emmys down 11 percent from the past two years.

The declining popularity of live broadcasted television left the much anticipated 70th Emmy ceremony struggling—but the awkwardness didn’t stop there.

Yet again, major diversity issues presented themselves throughout the three-hour show. As the hosts, Michael Che and Colin Jost, made jokes about Christianity, and more and more white actors took to the stage to collect awards, the atmosphere was detectable from the faces of cringing audience members.

Expectations

The 2017 ceremony seemed to signal the start of a progressive movement, away from historic ideologies. All three lead actor awards were given to men from diverse backgrounds and other categories were also more equally distributed than previous ceremonies. Winners included Sterling K. Brown, Riz Ahmed, Lena Waithe and Atlanta.

This year, the promising prospect continued as the nominee pool included a record 36 non-white actors—a 20 percent increase from 2017. Hollywood was quick to make this known before announcing its winners.

What actually happened?

The show began with the musical opening number: “We Solved It!” Kate McKinnon, Kenan Thompson, Kristen Bell and RuPaul (to name but a few) mocked the industry with a poignant song about diversity.

The song referenced Sandra Oh—the first Asian woman to ever be nominated for a lead actress Emmy: “There were none, now there’s one. And so we’re done!” It appeared that, whilst the joke seemed slightly awkward, the 2018 ceremony was being set up to include a diverse and inspiring winner’s circle.

Oh didn’t win—“It’s an honor just to be Asian,” she joked.

Instead, this year’s emphasis on diversity served to draw attention to the fact that only three non-white recipients received awards during the main broadcast.

On a pre-recorded clip, Michael Che did present what he called the “Reparation Emmys”.

“As a black comedian, for so many years our TV legends and heroes have gone unrecognized,

“So this year as host, I took it upon myself to finally right some of those wrongs. I present: The Reparation Emmys,” Che said.

The awards credited Marla Gibbs (The Jeffersons), Kadeem Hardison (A Different World), Jaleel White (Family Matters), Jimmie Walker (Good Times), Tichina Arnold (Everybody Hates Chris), and John Witherspoon (The Wayan Bros). Gibbs had previously been nominated five times and never won.

As the night unfolded, Amazon’s The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel became the first streaming show to win an Emmy, and Regina Kind (Seven Seconds) and Thandie Newton (Westworld) also took home trophies. Darren Criss, whose mother is Filipino, also took home Best Actor in a Limited Series for his role in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.

Game of Thrones, previously criticized for lacking diversity, ended the ceremony by once again winning Outstanding Drama. With the show’s final season coming up, more diverse winners from the production in the near future seem unlikely.

Highlights of the Emmys

In a strange turn of events, Glen Weiss shocked everyone, including girlfriend Jan Svendsen, by proposing to her while accepting his reward for Outstanding Directing for a Variety Special.

Jenifer Lewis wore a bedazzled custom-made outfit by Nike, thanking them for supporting the football player and activist Colin Kaepernick. Kaepernick famously kneeled during the national anthem to protest against racial injustice.

A host of celebrities also used their outfits to advocate political agendas. Accessories included Planned Parenthood and “I Am a Voter” badges, and ACLU blue ribbons. Sarah Sophie Flicker also arrived with a “Stop Kavanaugh” message drawn onto her arm.

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel star, Rachel Brosnahan, even urged people to vote in the upcoming midterm elections during her acceptance speech, and comedian Hannah Gadsby infused hers with parody.

“I mean, for somebody like me—a nobody, from nowhere—gets this sweet gig, free suit, new boots, just ’cause I don’t like men? That’s a joke, of course. Just jokes, fellas, calm down.

“Hashtag: NotAllMenButALotOfEm. No, it is just jokes, but what are jokes these days? We don’t know. Nobody knows what jokes are. Especially not men! Am I right, fellas? That’s why I’m presenting alone,” she said.

After a somewhat uncomfortable show, the reality of technical and societal change seems to be placing stress on traditional live network broadcasts. This year, the Emmys used the Primetime awards to force us to recognise that they have become more self-aware, but their enlightenment failed to deliver entertainment and implication.

The Creative Arts Emmys actually showcased a record number of non-white winners, but with much less press than the Primetime awards, a lot of these happened offstage. Clearly, Hollywood still has a long way to go on its road to diversity.

Further reading: The Relevancy of BlacKkKlansman

Serena Williams Anger

Why We Should Channel Our Inner Serena Williams

Serena Williams’ anger during the US Open final was justified, and more women should tap in to their inner fury. 

On Saturday 8 September, Serena Williams competed for her seventh title in a finals match against Naomi Osaka, and the rest will be history. Our children will say: “Remember when women weren’t allowed to be angry?”

Umpire Carlos Ramous issued a violation against Williams, following her coach giving her hand signals throughout the game. Williams went on to smash her racket on the ground and was issued another violation and a point penalty. Finally, a verbal discussion with Ramos ended with Williams calling the umpire a “thief” and being given a game penalty. Since the exchange, Williams has been fined $17,000 for three code violations and has even been turned into a racist caricature that populates the internet, alongside never-ending examples of slander.

The issue here is not with these penalties occurring, rather with the unfairness of them rarely being issued to other, male offenders. Retyping these events, it is impossible to stop the anger that rises up. And yet, that is exactly what women have been told to do for centuries. For men, anger is an idolized trait—it displays bravery, leadership and has aided in the act of subduing a woman, throughout history. For the silent, polite woman that exists within the societal eye, anger like Williams’ indicates that she is “hysterical” or having a “meltdown”.

For men, anger is an idolized trait—it displays bravery, leadership and has aided in the act of subduing a woman, throughout history. For the silent, polite woman that exists within the societal eye, anger like Williams’ indicates that she is “hysterical” or having a “meltdown”

These words, so naturally coming to the tongue of the men that spoke them, attack Williams’ temperament and generate an image of weakness. Williams on the other hand—a powerful Black athlete—exudes strength from every muscle in her body. Williams’ behaviour has also been criticised as robbing Osaka of the highlight of her career, presenting Williams as a monstrous figure that goes back on the weak, hysterical interpretation.

Instead, by expressing her feelings, Williams has performed the “angry black woman” stereotype and has provided a catalyst for even more discrimination against black women. In other words, she cannot win here. With it being revealed that she has been drug tested more than the top American men and women’s players this year, and following the ban issued on her custom Nike cat suit, it is clear that Williams is being singled out.

Following the match, retired US tennis star Andy Roddick tweeted, “I’ve regrettably said worse and I’ve never gotten a game penalty”. In other news, French tennis player Alize Cornet also recently received a code violation for briefly changing her shirt on the court—something countless male players have done with no repercussions. The double standards here are shocking.

Male athletes who have made similar accusations to the umpire, and only received a verbal warning: allowed to be angry. The swarms of people who are indignant that Williams should call a male sports official sexist: allowed to be angry. The female athletes who experience this sexism: not allowed to be angry.

Osaka’s victory has made her the first Japanese woman to win the women’s singles title in the US Open and it is no secret that she considers Williams her idol. Osaka also has African heritage—she told U.S.A Today that when people see her they “are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a black girl.”

It is clear that Williams’ legacy is inspiring black girls to be like her, and also to beat her. In light of this, this step back into a more misogynistic era becomes a progression for ethnic women everywhere. It is Williams’s determination and perseverance that can inspire not only budding tennis players, but also every woman in our society. It is her rage that can be used productively to unite women. Anger can be used to instigate change and to abolish the societal limitation of thinking through stereotypes.

“You owe me an apology”, is something we’re allowed to say.

“I’m not a cheat” is okay to tell someone if they’re attacking your character.

“I’m going to continue to fight for women,” should be said in anger, by all of us.

Further reading: Mac Miller’s Death is Tragic—But It’s Not Ariana Grande’s Fault

Hurricane Florence vs. the Carolinas

Hurricane Florence vs. the Carolinas

A day-by-day recap of the devastation caused by Hurricane Florence.

With more than one million people under mandatory evacuation, Hurricane Florence—at its worst a Category 5—was set to bring a powerful storm-surge to North Carolina. For an area unaccustomed to hurricanes, the destruction that followed has been catastrophic. Whilst Florence has weakened to a tropical depression, the current death toll stands at 17 and vast flooding continues to threaten the Carolinas and West Virginia.

Slow mover

By Thursday afternoon, Hurricane Florence’s peak wind speeds had fallen to 110mph, downgrading the hurricane to a Category 2. The relief was short-lived—the size of the storm’s wind field had increased, and the large hurricane made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina as a Category 1 on Friday morning.

Forecasters warned that the biggest threats were still to come, in what was expected to be a historic rain event. North Carolina was subjected to relentless rain and wind throughout the day, causing huge amounts of flooding with over seven inches of rainfall. 

Stranded

Toppled trees and debris from ruined storefronts blocked the flooded streets, and over half a million customers were left without power.

Emergency responders and volunteers in New Bern—a riverfront city near North Carolina’s coast—rescued hundreds who were trapped in their homes, cars or on rooftops. Residents were advised to take refuge on second story levels or attics to await rescue.

The first death reports

Among the first to die in the storm surge were a mother and her baby, after a tree fell on their home in Wilmington, North Carolina. Emergency responders worked for hours to save them but they were both confirmed dead in the afternoon. The child’s father was taken to a nearby hospital with injuries, police said. The infant is one of two babies to have died in the storm.

A third person died in North Carolina’s Pender County and another two people were pronounced dead in Kinston, North Carolina. More deaths followed due to electrocution, wind levels, road fatalities and fires.

Tropical storm

By Friday evening, Florence had downgraded to a tropical storm and was moving slowly towards South Carolina, but the rain didn’t stop.

On Saturday morning, the National Weather Service predicted “catastrophic flash flooding and prolonged significant river flooding”. Roads became impassable and emergency responders and volunteers made a further 700 rescues. As Saturday came to an end, 13 people had been confirmed dead, mainly as the result of flash floods.

Tropical depression

Florence weakened to a tropical depression on Sunday morning, with maximum sustained winds of 35mph. Nevertheless, The National Hurricane Center warned about the possibility of landslides across the Carolinas and West Virginia and stated that rain levels could reach 40 inches. More deaths were confirmed, bringing the toll to at least 17.

No relief in sight

Around 740,000 homes and businesses remain without power and Wilmington, North Carolina, has been completely cut off by floodwaters. The NFL Foundation has announced that it will contribute $1 million in Florence relief efforts, for the immediate needs of those affected.

Florence is expected to produce excessive rainfall as it moves from the Carolinas to the Mid-Atlantic and southern New England this week. Over 1,000 rescues have been carried out, hundreds of people are still trapped, and evacuation is ongoing. Authorities are urging people to be prepared for sudden flooding.

In a news conference, Gov. Roy Cooper warned that the storm has “never been more dangerous than it is right now.”

“The worst is yet to come,” say officials.

You’re Not Alone: Facing Loneliness in College

There is often an expectation that going to college will result in the commencement of the best years of a person’s entire life. For some people, this is true. Becoming independent, moving away from home and making new friends can provide the freedom that they need in order to flourish. Yet, for others, this isn’t the case at all.

Whilst college can be fun and exciting, it is natural that such huge amounts of change can cause anybody to feel anxious, vulnerable and insecure, prompting feelings of loneliness in college. According to a 2017 survey of 48,000 college students, 64 percent said that they had felt “very lonely” in the previous 12 months.

So why doesn’t anybody talk about loneliness in college?

Thanks to pop-culture, the pressure to enjoy college is paramount, generating shame and silence in those who can’t keep up with their classmates’ levels of constant excitement.

College is pretty much a wildcard. Disappointment with reality compared to expectation is a huge struggle for students, along with being in a strange environment, lacking money, being unprepared for independent living, missing family and friends and lacking a routine. Not clicking with the people that you’re forced to live with and comparing your experiences to those on social media can lead to feelings of isolation and inadequacy.

With no one to check up on you, retreating into these suffocating feelings of loneliness can be easier than conforming to the pressure to fake it along with everyone else. This can cause mental health struggles such as anxiety and depression, and make it impossible to concentrate on your increased workload.

Sound familiar? Here’s how to face loneliness in college.

“Not clicking with the people that you’re forced to live with and comparing your experiences to those on social media can lead to feelings of isolation and inadequacy”

Talk to someone 

Telling someone that you’re feeling lonely and overwhelmed won’t fix the situation, but will relieve a huge weight from your shoulders and allow your brain to process these feelings objectively.

This person could be a family member, friend, neighbor or even a complete stranger or doctor. Colleges often have wellbeing and support groups that will help you to realize that other people are experiencing the same feelings as you.

Admitting that you’re lonely can be hard and feel embarrassing, but speaking out and realizing that it is normal to struggle will ease your mind. You might even make a new friend.

Put yourself out there

It can be hard, but making an effort to meet new people will increase your chances of finding someone who you connect with and combating loneliness in college. Don’t feel pressured to like everyone that you live with, choosing who we forge friendships with is one of life’s privileges.

It sounds cliché, but joining clubs and societies and being part of a team or learning a new skill can introduce you to new people, give you a sense of routine and distract your mind for a while. Sitting next to someone new in lectures and mustering the courage to ask them if they’ve finished the assignment could lead to conversation, and hanging out in community areas will also help you to feel included.

Posting on a social media group for your area of residence and asking if anyone wants to hang out can also introduce you to new friends. If you’re thinking about quitting anyway, what have you got to lose?

Look after your body 

Loneliness and mental health problems are often linked with decreases in physical health. Getting enough sleep, exercising and eating a healthy, balanced diet will not only give you energy, but also improve your mood and cognitive function, helping you to think a little more clearly.

Get a part-time job

If you had a part-time job before college, consider applying for a similar role or volunteering in your free time. Unlike the vast, new changes in your life, knowing what to expect in a job role will give you routine, distract you from your worries and help you to feel more settled. Not to mention, working will introduce you to an entirely new set of people and give you a break from your fellow students.

Remember: You are normal

It is so important to normalize the situation and realize that being lonely is not only okay, but also expected.

Every person is different and being thrown together with a group of strong personalities when you are more reserved, or vice versa, can make you feel different, in a bad way. People also naturally have different stress levels, coping abilities and family relationships.

Similarly, remember that social media is not a true representation of reality. People post staged highlights of their life, and in most cases do not live to that level of excitement on a day-to-day basis.

Give yourself time

Like with any big change, adjusting can take time. People take varying amounts of time to adjust to a situation and the academic year will also take a while to quieten down.

If you need to take time for yourself, then do. Equally, it’s okay to go home for the weekend, or take a break from college all together and apply again when you’re more prepared.

For some people, college just isn’t for them. There are so many other paths forward in life and nobody is going to judge you for wanting out of a bad one.

Monitor your mental health 

Whilst loneliness is not a mental health problem, lonely feelings can turn into anxious thoughts. If you’re feeling worried, depressed or having panic attacks, talk to someone. If your feelings of loneliness in college are interfering with your ability to function and taking over your daily life, then ask someone to step in.

Further reading: Mental Health Awareness in School

Run for President

Kanye West to Run for President

Kanye West, rap artist and husband to reality TV star Kim Kardashian, has announced that he will run for president in 2024.

This is not the first time that West has made claims on the Whitehouse. At the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards, he declared: “I have decided in 2020 to run for president”.

In a recent radio interview with DJ Pharris on Power 92 Chicago, he added, “Yes, 100 percent it could happen…2024”. He has further tweeted a simple “2024” and “#Kanye2024”—apparently postponing his plans to run for office.

“If I decide to do it, it will be done, I’m not going to try,” West said. He also stated that one of his biggest aims as president would be to make sure that “the medical industry flourishes”.

His other concern was for “paper”—money. “I’m not going in, when I become president, to f**k up the paper, because I tell you what? Trump ain’t f***ing up the paper. Those jobs are up, those taxes are being saved,” he said.

West’s support for conservative US president, Donald Trump is no secret. The rapper previously publicized his meeting with the president where the two discussed “multicultural issues”.

Nevertheless, West has also disagreed with certain Trump policies in the past. He informed Pharris that he “had love” for both Trump and left wing senator, Bernie Sanders.

“For someone to say you can’t ride with both sides…it’s like a modern idea of gang banging or something…even red or blue—it’s still red or blue. It’s divisions,” he said. “We don’t need to think in divisions. We need to think in arms because we’re actually one race, one people, one civilization.”

Like with most of his statements, West’s claim to run for president has received both attention and criticism. We’re undecided if West as president is the worst or best idea we’ve ever heard.

Watch the full interview with Pharris here.

Further reading: Trump’s Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame Voted to Be Removed