Salmonella Outbreak Sickens Over 90 People

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WRITTEN BY: Billy Gardner
Salmonella Outbreak: the culprit bacteria
Image Source: Taragui via Wiki Commons
Salmonella Outbreak: the culprit bacteria

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention is currently investigating a Salmonella outbreak that sickened 93 people in 19 different states.

“Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and Washington, D.C. have reported cases linked to this outbreak,” CNN reported.

The CDC reports that 10 people have been hospitalized since the first report of the outbreak on January 28. The most recent report of Salmonella came as late as last Monday, and fortunately throughout all this time, no deaths have occurred. The strain of unusual bacteria that sickened all those people is known as Salmonella Bareilly.

"CDC is collaborating with public health officials in several states and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to investigate a multi-state outbreak of salmonella serotype Bareilly infections," CDC spokeswoman Lola Russell said in a statement.

The CDC reported they were unsure what type of food is causing the Salmonella outbreak, but there have been reports that people sickened by the outbreak were reported to have eaten sushi and similar type foods shortly before becoming infected.

The symptoms linked to Salmonella poisoning are: diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever 12 to 72 hours after infection, according to the CDC. Most individuals recover after four to seven days without treatment, but in rare cases, serious illness requiring hospitalization develop.

CDC officials are doing what they can to link the cause of the Salmonella outbreak, and they released a statement assuring the public, "if a specific food source is identified for this outbreak, public health officials will alert the public and take further steps to prevent additional illnesses."

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