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Ways College Students Can Manage Academic Fatigue & Burnout

Ways College Students Can Manage Academic Fatigue & Burnout

Recent statistics on student stress are disheartening. Many catch our eye, but this is especially alarming: “39.1% of college students in the U.S. report feeling well-rested for only one or two days a week.” And 19.5% don’t feel rested at all.

There’s no way college students can be at their best, not getting adequate rest. And it’s no wonder academic fatigue and burnout are hitting them harder than ever. If we don’t address it now, the performance of college students will continue to diminish, and their futures will hang in limbo.

If you’re experiencing academic fatigue, stress, and burnout, these four tips can help you get to the other side.

Know When You’re Experiencing Burnout

University of the People defines academic burnout as “a negative emotional, physical and mental reaction to prolonged study that results in exhaustion, frustration, lack of motivation and reduced ability in school.”

Understanding the definition of general burnout is also critical. You don’t want to overlook a burnout diagnosis just because school isn’t what’s making you feel burnt out. The three criteria for a burnout diagnosis include:

  1. Severe lack of energy and complete exhaustion
  2. Feeling mentally distanced or increasingly negative about one’s job
  3. Diminished effectiveness in one’s role

Whether you’re experiencing general burnout or its subset academic burnout, you need to be able to pinpoint when you’re experiencing it so that you can manage it. If you’re encountering any, all, or a combination of the below symptoms for a prolonged period, academic fatigue or burnout is likely the culprit:

  • Your creative spark is gone
  • Your attendance is suffering
  • Your body is simply exhausted
  • You can’t concentrate in class
  • You’re more irritable and frustrated
  • You’re missing deadlines more often
  • Sitting through a lecture is nearly impossible
  • You’ve lost confidence in the work you’re producing
  • There’s a spike in feelings of anxiety and/or depression
  • You’re no longer interested in participating in discussions and group projects

It’s important to note that burnout can overlap with other mental health conditions. For example, you could be losing your creative spark and energy because of depression. Or you could be more irritable, frustrated, and lack confidence because of an anxiety disorder.

With this in mind, separating burnout from other mental health challenges is vital to getting better.

Be Intentional When Choosing Classes and Your Schedule

College students are known to take on more than they should when choosing classes, whether to graduate earlier, have a better shot at an internship, or something else entirely. In addition, getting into specific courses can be so competitive that many students will take, say, the 7 a.m. class even though they know they aren’t morning people.

Taking too many classes and choosing the wrong times to take them can lead to high levels of stress that ultimately result in academic fatigue and burnout.

It’s much better for your health and educational success to be intentional when choosing classes and your schedule. Really take the time to select courses you’ll enjoy and engage in. Now, you won’t enjoy every class. So, supplement the ones you don’t care for but have to take with those you’re excited about.

And be sure to put together a schedule you can maintain. For example, don’t go for early morning classes if you know you do your best work in the afternoon and vice versa. Also, figure out the best way to spread courses throughout the week to ensure you’re accommodating how you learn, study, and live.

Grow Real Relationships With Your Professors

Good for you if you’re lucky enough never to experience academic fatigue and burnout. But for those that do, having good relationships with professors can help make the experience much more manageable.

You know those office hours your professor tells you about on the first day of class? Unfortunately, not nearly enough students use them to their advantage. But you should. Use office hours to develop genuine relationships with your professors.

Commit to getting together with your professors at least once a week. Not only can they help you with any challenges you’re having with coursework, but professors also encourage students to use office hours to talk about things other than school, burnout, and academic fatigue included.

When you have a strong relationship with your professors, you’ll be more inclined to be transparent about what you’re going through. And together, you can develop a plan to simplify school and life.

Put a Plan in Place for Recovery

You’re burnt out, and academic fatigue has gotten the best of you. What do you do? Well, first, don’t panic. Most students will experience burnout at some point. Already having a plan to recover from it will fast-track you getting back to yourself and your studies.

The first step is putting the books down and taking a break. Then, do something that you’re passionate about. And for the long term, focus on boosting your energy levels healthily. For instance, incorporate a self-care routine in your day. Drink more water than anything else. Cut down on your caffeine and alcohol consumption. Exercise regularly too.

Don’t put so much pressure on yourself to do, understand, and manage all that comes with college on your own. Burnout and academic fatigue will be right around the corner if you do.

Instead, lean on your relationships with your professors for support. Choose classes and schedules strategically. And finally, know the signs of burnout and put a plan in place to recover from it.

SEE ALSO: Common Problems When Writing Your Assignments

Leadership Skills that Help You Land a Job After College

Leadership Skills that Help You Land a Job After College

College is a great place to learn the ins and outs of your chosen major, but it empowers students to build more than technical skills. You can also use your time in college to develop valuable soft skills that are easily transferable between careers — including those required of strong leaders.

When you’re getting ready to graduate and start finding a job, many of your potential employers will evaluate your potential as a leader. Students who learn, practice, and excel in their leadership skills are viewed by managers as highly capable of taking on diverse positions, contributing more to their companies, and taking on higher-level roles over time.

However, the ability to lead isn’t something you can simply put on your resume. You’ll need to be able to demonstrate the right skills during your interviews to impress the companies you’re applying to. Here are the leadership skills recruiters and hiring managers value most, as well as how you can develop them while getting your degree.

Modern communication skills

Leadership has changed a lot in recent years, but communication remains one of the most sought-after skills across industries. Applicants with strong resumes can lose out to less qualified job candidates if they have poor communication skills. On the flip side, great communicators can win significantly more job offers than their competitors.

Modern communication skills must be comprehensive. In addition to being great at written and verbal communication, today’s leaders need to be technologically literate. Video meetings and other remote communication channels (like Slack and email) are now the norm. Consider joining a public speaking course, speech and debate group, or career prep program in college to practice your ability to choose words and gestures carefully.

Being culturally sensitive in your communications is also becoming incredibly important, especially as businesses implement more diversity and inclusion initiatives. College is the perfect time to interact with people from different backgrounds and listen to their feedback.

Organizational skills

While technical skills allow employees to successfully complete tasks, organizational skills make you capable of taking an entire project from ideation to execution. Businesses are looking for organized leaders who can carefully identify goals and keep track of their progress to ensure their projects can end successfully. Leaders should be able to delegate tasks, follow up, and avoid stalled projects with ease.

In college, practicing organizational skills is simple. Challenge yourself to stay on top of your assignments while taking part in extracurriculars. If possible, take on leadership roles within those extracurriculars and work toward ambitious (but feasible) goals each semester.

Adaptability

The business world is shifting faster than ever before. The COVID-19 pandemic — which forced many workplaces to quickly go virtual and develop creative strategies to stay afloat — proved the importance of adaptability as a leadership skill. Job candidates who are able to smoothly adapt to new tasks, software, teams, and work cultures (rather than resist change) are highly desirable in the eyes of recruiters and hiring managers.

A large part of being adaptable is the ability to stay calm and work through stressful situations. Since shifts in your work environment can throw you into unfamiliar situations, employers want job candidates who can keep a level head and excel in the face of change.

One way you can develop your adaptability is by finding healthy outlets for stress. For instance, you can implement meditation into your daily or weekly routine to practice healthily dealing with stressful situations after college. Start meditating during your midterms or finals and see if it’s the right outlet for you.

Empathy

Empathy is another leadership skill that’s increasingly prized in the workspace. As more companies become employee-focused, recruiters and hiring managers are seeking leaders who can contribute to a positive work environment — particularly as the current worker shortage continues to impact their ability to find qualified employees. Great leaders must be exceptional at listening and collaborating with diverse peers and managers.

Volunteering can be a great way to practice your empathy skills in college. Challenge yourself to work alongside and serve populations that you don’t normally interact with and step into their shoes. Practice entering conversations without any expectations and be curious about the people you speak with.

Land your dream job

Landing a job right after college is no longer a simple matter of demonstrating the industry skills you’ve developed. It also requires you to show off your soft skills — the ones that allow you to act as an exceptional leader in any role. Soft skills give you room to grow within a company over time.

Start by developing your communication skills, making sure to practice increasingly prized skills like video calling and empathetic listening. Plus, learn how to be organized in your work and adaptable to new (and potentially stressful) situations to increase your value in the eyes of recruiters and hiring teams.

SEE ALSO: 5 DOs and DON’Ts for Landing Your First Job After College

4 Types of Engineering Careers for Graduates

4 Types of Engineering Careers for Graduates

Graduating from college is an exciting time, but there are now many tough choices ahead. While many students know that their college choice can affect their career prospects, they don’t realize that the path they take after they graduate can have a major impact on the rest of their lives.

Your professional career can be subject to change, but getting it off to the right start is the best approach for anyone who wants to achieve real success.

The type of engineer you become depends on your degree choice and the experience you earned during college. After all, if you took computer sciences, then you’ll need to go into the computer engineering or technology sectors. Alternatively, if your degree was in electrical engineering, then you’ll probably be looking at jobs in this niche.

Still, there are many options within these specific sectors, so you need to make sure that you choose the right one for you. It also depends on what you want to achieve from your new job and where you want to end up in the future.

Here are some of the main types of engineering careers that graduates can explore after finishing their degrees.

Starting A Career In Private Sector Engineering

The private sector is a great place to start your engineering career, particularly if you’re aiming to make money from your new role. The average salary for a US engineer is around $91,700 per year, but in the private sector, this can rise astronomically, particularly if you choose a lucrative field such as oil and gas. So, if you’re looking to become financially successful and enjoy many perks, then private sector engineering could be a great choice for you. There are many privately-owned companies seeking engineering talent, so you should explore job fares while at college to find suitable prospects to start your journey.

Entering Into Public Sector Engineering

Another option is going into public sector engineering. This means working for a company that is partially or wholly owned by the government. It can also mean working for the government directly, as a paid advisor or on projects the government is handling itself. As a general rule, public sector employees earn less than their private-sector counterparts, but the public sector does often offer competitive rates of pay. There are also many opportunities for advancement, so you could earn the status and expertise you’ve always craved by working in the public sector. Again, the best way to identify and explore public sector engineering jobs is to visit trade and job fares and to network within the engineering market.

Owning Your Own Engineering Business

Working for yourself is the holy grail for many graduates, and while it might take some time, you could eventually achieve the success you crave by starting your own engineering business. You’ll be able to set your own schedule and choose what projects you take on. Starting an engineering business can be challenging, and you’ll need as much expert support as you can get. So, you’ll need to explore a range of services. One important service that you should look into is engineer insurance. You can find a variety of engineering insurance policies to fit your business needs. This type of insurance is specialized for engineers to protect their careers and business. These policies will get you coverage to protect you from legal fees and damaged vehicles. Commonly, they will cover general liability and workers’ compensation. With support from experts who understand your market, you can get your new engineering business off to a flying start. It might take time for your business to earn the success you crave, and running any company is hard work, but it will pay off when you achieve the reputation for industry excellence that you and your team deserve.

Becoming An Engineering Consultant

If you want to work for yourself but don’t want to become a business owner who manages large projects and expansive teams, then becoming a freelance engineering consultant could be the ideal solution for you. Working as a freelancer is a cost-effective way to work for yourself and find the flexibility you want from your career. You’ll be able to assist on projects and share your knowledge and expertise, then leave the on-site team to their work. Becoming a respected consultant can take time, and it’s usually the product of many years of hard work. But, after you’ve built up an impressive resume, you can get yourself noticed by many large organizations and start sharing your engineering knowledge.

In Summary

Finishing an engineering degree is just the beginning of your career, but it’s also a time of great change and many choices. This article should help you to understand some of the types of engineering careers you can explore so that you can make an informed choice. You’ll then be able to find the perfect role that suits your aptitude and skills. Take the time to research each of these options in more detail to understand which one might work best for you. There’s no hard and fast way to find the right option, but by doing your research, you can give yourself the best possible start to your engineering career.

SEE ALSO: How Do I Become a Civil Engineer?

5 DOs and DON'Ts for Landing Your First Job After College

5 DOs and DON’Ts for Landing Your First Job After College

So, to acquire your first job, you must do the right things and prevent potential blunders. Landing on the job is essential!

5 DOs for successfully landing in your first job

Create a LinkedIn Profile

This is one of the first tasks you should complete as soon as you arrive at college. Creating a network of like-minded professionals is incredibly inspiring, and you may do by utilizing the LinkedIn platform. When establishing the profile, take special care to include only genuine information and not any fluff. Be active and frequently write about the seminars you’re attending or what you’re learning for your career.

Begin by incorporating honors or accolades, a review of your talents, and a synopsis of the kind of careers that may interest you; it’s a good idea to start early. Include internships you’ve held; they demonstrate that you’re ambitious and capable of taking on responsibilities. You can delete your early jobs and add new ones as you gain experience and move up in your career.

Research about the future perspectives

You should research your future perspectives on the career opportunities before finalizing anything. The internet provides answers to any inquiries people may have. For example, a graduate seeking a position as Paleontologist would discover that just a few people successfully crack a job in their discipline. This information helps her in the future and impacts her final decision.

Build a strong resume

There are still so many people who do not have a solid CV, even though you might assume everyone knows this. All they do is scribble down all the points in haste. Instead, update your resume, check for spelling and grammatical issues, and personalize it each time you apply for a job to increase your chances of being seen. Another option is to design a visual resume builder to help your CV stand out. Check that your references are still up to date and reachable at the email and phone numbers mentioned, and always add a personal cover letter when applying for a job.

A generic ‘to whom it may concern’ greeting will no longer suffice in today’s tech-savvy world when all it takes to find out who your application is destined for is a quick Google search.

Create your portfolio

Sometimes your resume is simply not enough. Your portfolio is your ultimate rescuer in these times. Nowadays, most recruiting managers want you to demonstrate your website or portfolio of works. You should be prepared. Personal websites address many interview questions, putting you ahead of the competition.

Actively follow the placement cell of your college

Even though this appears to be the most obvious path to get career advice, according to the report, just 29 percent of students visit their college’s placement cell. They are the ones that work tirelessly every month to guarantee that as many students from the college as possible get placed. Consequently, you should never overlook them.

They will connect you with an alum who works in your subject of interest and can help you find a job. The alumni database is the most powerful resource for helping with résumé and cover letter development and job interview preparation.

5 DON’Ts for successfully landing in your first job

Don’t wait till graduation to start applying

You may believe that you should first complete your graduation and then look for employment, but this is the most common error that you can make that severely limits your career prospects. You should start the process of applying as soon as you enter your last year. You will require a lot of time to figure out your preparation level and how much additional work you need to do on them. It is unlikely that you will be picked after the first interview. So, keep an eye on the clock.

Don’t ignore your CGPA

Ignoring CGPA is one of the most common blunders made by pupils. They believe that CGPA is unimportant and ignore the coursework. Don’t make this error. Most recruiting companies use a CGPA as a criterion for only applying. If you do not match that criterion, you will be rejected at the admission stage.

Don’t ignore interview preparation

Have you gone through your interview questions yet? Have you prepared a list of follow-up questions? You are not ready for an interview if you answered no to any or all these questions! Don’t allow performance anxiety to ruin your prospects once you’ve gotten through the door for an interview, especially if you lack formal experience.

Don’t stay an introvert

Most organizations require the ability to communicate clearly and effectively both in-person and in print. Employers search for this in applicants, especially entry-level workers. An applicant with a solid résumé but weak communication skills may lose out to a less qualified candidate who knows how to communicate their argument properly. So, don’t stay an introvert. Communicate with everyone around you.

Don’t ignore internships

Getting an internship at a company is never too early or too late. According to the research, students do not recognize the benefits of internships and cannot obtain them. So, anytime you come across an internship opportunity, take advantage of it. Don’t overthink about the eligibility criteria. Apply to anything and everything.

Conclusion

Applying for jobs doesn’t guarantee you’ll get them all, but that’s not the point. There is only one job available, and it must be the proper one. If you have a solid CV, cover letter, LinkedIn profile, and well-developed cover letter and interview approach, you’re well on your way to the next step of your career.

900 Employees Sacked in Brutal Zoom Call by CEO

900 Employees Sacked in Brutal Zoom Call by CEO

The CEO of an online company fired 900 of his employees in a brutal Zoom call before slamming them as “lazy” and claiming that they were “stealing” from customers.

Vishal Garg, the CEO of New York online mortgage lenders, Better.com, dismissed approximately 9 per cent of his employees last Wednesday, only a few weeks before Christmas.

Garg, in a very blunt manor, stated: “This isn’t news that you’re going to want to hear…If you’re on this call, you are part of the unlucky group that is being laid off. Your employment here is terminated effective immediately.”

Prior to letting his workers know of the bad news, Gard said: “I come to you with not great news.

“The market has changed, as you know, and we have to move with it in order to survive so that hopefully, we can continue to thrive and deliver on our mission.

“This isn’t news that you’re going to want to hear.

“But ultimately it was my decision. And I wanted you to hear from me. It’s been a really, really challenging decision to make.”

“This is the second time in my career I’m doing this and I do not want to do this.

“The last time I did it, I cried. This time, I hope to be stronger.

The 43-year-old maintained his authority, blaming the fluctuations within the market even though the company recently received a $750 million cash infusion.

He also cited market efficiency, performance and productivity as key reasons to why the workers were given the boot and mentioned how the workers were unproductive as they were only worker two hours a day. But he stated that all this was necessary for his company to “move in order to survive”.

One of those unlucky 900 who were on the Zoom call recorded the moment they were sacked, which included a large amount of swearing.

In the footage, the worker could be heard saying: “F**k you dude. Are you f**king kidding me?”

SEE ALSO: 12 Christmas Dinners Around the World