Topless photos surface of Prince William’s Catherine

The royal family takes legal action against various tabloid publications

WRITTEN BY: Jason Oliva
Prince William and Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, at Buckingham Palace after their wedding.
Image Source: Dogbertio 14 via WikiMedia Commons
Prince William and Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, at Buckingham Palace after their wedding.

An Irish tabloid newspaper risks legal action from England’s royal family after publishing topless pictures of Prince William’s wife, Catherine. The royal couple has already taking action against the French magazine Closer for publishing a dozen photos of Catherine as she sunbathed topless at a secluded French country house.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge—formerly Kate Middleton—has become the subject of what can only be described as an invasion of privacy. The pictures have incited a debate over freedom of the press and the media could potentially face new regulations after the scandal.

Now, an Italian gossip magazine has followed suit and published a 26-page spread on Catherine, leading William to consult the palace’s legal authorities to prevent more publications from showcasing his wife’s photos.

The Italian magazine Chi, one of the three publications passing around the controversial pictures, is owned by former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s publishing house, Mondadori.

Chi editor Alfonso Signorini told the Associated Press that he did not fear legal action because the photos were already in the public domain following Closer’s publication.

Lawyers for the royal couple are due to appear in court in Nanterre, France to seek an injunction against Mondadori. The palace also said it looks to seek damages from the Italian publication, and that royal family lawyers would file a criminal complaint against the photographer responsible for the intimate photos.

The scandalous photos were taken from afar as William and Catherine enjoyed a weekend at a relative’s country house in France. The palace said it would be up to French prosecutors to decide whether to pursue a criminal case for trespassing and breach of privacy.

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